Watch the terrible 2021 Texas Rangers through the faithful eyes of the fan in section 315

ARLINGTON – One of the features of the new Globe Life Field press box is the view. From up there, we can look down on the Rangers game and also control any billionaire orbiting the planet in a SpaceX rocket.

Another: put the media in sight with a few fans on the top deck, which is different from the “old” park, where we were locked in glass, like the turtles in a terrarium.

Which brings me to the woman in section 315.

Section 315 could be the weirdest section of the new park. There are only 30 seats in three rows. It’s not the top of the stadium, but it’s close enough to count the rivets.

It requires some desire to get there. It is located in the upper lobby, but you have to go up a flight of stairs and then into the corner. The first time I walked around there, I somehow finished two sections.

I wandered this way because I wanted to meet the woman in 315, whose name turns out to be Pam Lunk. She lives in Arlington with her husband Peter and her senior bitch Sophie. She also owns a 20-year package.

In 2020, when the Rangers moved to Globe Life Field, the Lunks decided to move from a mid-season package to a full-season subscriber. An unfortunate moment, you might say, what happened to a pandemic in the first year and, making wild gestures, that season.

Still, Pam has been in her seat most nights this season. When the most restless baseball journalist in the world stepped up to the drinking machine or the toilet, because, at that age, that’s how things go, she would look, smile, and greet. The Rangers are heading for the fifth straight season losing and in all likelihood 100 losses and she continues to show up.

Arlington season ticket holder Pam Lunk sees the Texas Rangers play during an MLB baseball game between the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros in Arlington, Texas, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. (Michael Ainsworth / Special collaborator)
Arlington season ticket holder Pam Lunk sees the Texas Rangers play during an MLB baseball game between the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros in Arlington, Texas, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. (Michael Ainsworth / Special collaborator)(Michael Ainsworth / Special Collaborator)

That’s why I had to talk to her on Monday when she was one of the two people in the section. Peter was traveling to Montana. He had dropped Sophie the golden retriever to his parents, grabbed a bottle of sealed water (still allowed in the park) and was still in his seat 45 minutes before the first launch.

She was there not to kiss Jose Altuve. Or to grab a head. And, of course, not to participate in the signature concessions, which at the moment seem to be chicken wings or, indeed, chicken offers. No, he was there to play.

“For me, it’s still the biggest game on the planet,” he said. “Yes, this year there have been times when it has been difficult, but lately it has become a little more exciting with young children. There is always something to expect, desire or dream about. And, I’ll be honest, some nights I don’t have the whole game left if … ”

I didn’t need to finish the sentence. Monday was one of those nights. We spent about 90 minutes talking about baseball and the Rangers. It included two entries. The Rangers, at the time, were already behind 7-0. Altuve had been beating twice. It was booed with the same force that a crowd of 18,903 people was able to gather. He responded on every occasion with success.

Pam, who grew up fond of Astros at La Porte after her father took her to the Astrodome with some free tickets after doing the honor recognition, was not among the boos. Ah, he lost his love for the Astros long after moving to Arlington. And he said he booed him during the first series, but that has been the only time he’s booed this season.

He hasn’t kissed the Rangers either. Thinking about it, it doesn’t look like fans, in general, have done so this year. Rangers fans are too polite or, after five losing seasons, are too comfortable in this 72-degree controlled climate or are too apathetic to do so.

Either way, it’s just not Pam Lunk. This year he has spent more time reflecting on defensive changes. Observe how defensive responsibilities change depending on the situation. She is there to enjoy the game.

“I’m probably not the typical person who comes to the games,” he said.

Season ticket holders Dallas Brewton of Albuquerque, NM and Pam Lunk of Arlington see the Texas Rangers play during an MLB baseball game between the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros in Arlington, Texas on Thursday, May 16. September 2021. (Michael Ainsworth / Special Collaborator)
Season ticket holders Dallas Brewton of Albuquerque, NM and Pam Lunk of Arlington see the Texas Rangers play during an MLB baseball game between the Texas Rangers and Houston Astros in Arlington, Texas on Thursday, May 16. September 2021. (Michael Ainsworth / Special Collaborator)(Michael Ainsworth / Special Collaborator)

It doesn’t bother him to sit so high. They were in the fourth row of the upper deck, behind the house plate, across the street. When they looked at 315 at Globe Life Field, they liked the intimacy of the section.

They liked to be in the back row, with only a fire commissioner placed on their shoulders, with no one shouting or shouting from behind. They liked that they were at the end of the section without anyone being forced to stir with beers or two-meter-long Boomsticks. They could just watch the game from the point of view of the back of the board.

Oh, that doesn’t mean he doesn’t care. She is a tax accountant by trade. His company has a factory in St. Louis. He usually makes one trip a year with the time he can see the Cardinals play, though he admits he felt he had to exorcise demons to go to the stadium where the Rangers lost the 2011 World Series.

She was devastated by Joey Gallo’s trade, but she “understood” the reason behind it. He has looked for someone else to “glorify.” She has been impressed by Nick Solak’s recovery after a mid-season setback and Isiah Kiner-Falefa’s uproar. The development of Taylor Hearn as a headline.

He likes Chris Woodward and hopes he has a chance to lead a true big league rival in Texas. He also has the slightest skepticism about the Rangers ’involvement in improving the roster this offseason.

“I’ve been a little disappointed with how the season has gone,” he said about 2021. “But I have to hope it gets better. I’ll be curious to see what happens this winter. I have to believe they’ll turn it around.

“Boy, it’s fun when they win,” he added. “Even the few victories they’ve gotten lately have been fun.”

Monday was not one of those nights. In the sixth inning, when Houston won a 13-1 lead, it was gone. But he returned to two of the other three games in the series. She will return to the White Sox this weekend. And she and Peter will be back again next year, regardless of whether the Rangers have revised the roster or not.

“Look,” he said, “this is my escape.”

And in this way, even the most lost season becomes convincing for Pam Lunk.

Twitter: @Evan_P_Grant

Adolis Garcia of the Texas Rangers celebrates his double, alongside Houston Astros second baseman Jose Altuve, during the seventh inning of a baseball game in Arlington, Texas, on Tuesday, September 14, 2021.

You’ll find more Rangers coverage in The Dallas Morning News here.


Credit – https://www.dallasnews.com/sports/rangers/2021/09/16/take-a-look-at-the-terrible-2021-texas-rangers-through-the-loyal-eyes-of-the-fan-in-section-315/